Simple Ideas that Will Make Shelter Dogs So Happy They’ll Shower You With Kisses

Simple Ideas that Will Make Shelter Dogs So Happy They’ll Shower You With Kisses

Shelter life is B-U-S-Y! We get it. It seems impossible to add another item to your daily to-do list. Take heart! Enrichment can be simple, fast, and inexpensive. Remember, even the smallest changes make a big difference.

marcia tiersky interns june 2017 1

Source: Marcia Tiersky for Animal Farm Foundation

Make the commitment to your dogs. Then reach out for support. You’ll find volunteers who want to do hands-on work, donors who will purchase items from your wish lists, and foster homes who will give dogs a temporary break.

But you don’t even need donors to purchase items for you. You have plenty of enrichment tools at your fingertips!

Here are three simple ideas for keeping the dogs in your care so happy they’ll want to cover you with kisses:

BUSY BUCKETS:

Fill an empty bucket or small pail with things to do, smell, and taste –  even the dog’s meal. Pack each item very tightly so that it will be challenging for the dog to remove them. Some ideas for bucket items: a stuffed Kong, a beef-broth soaked rag, a ball, a Nylabone, a water bottle or PVC pipe with a few treats, etc…

BUSY BOXES: 

Collect empty toilet paper rolls, cereal boxes, pasta boxes and other old boxes and layer them one inside the other. In between each box, place tasty treats and kibble. Some dogs really enjoy shredding items in their kennels.  Busy boxes are a cheap and easy enrichment tool that your volunteers can create and your dogs can enjoy.

ICE TREATS: You can make these in large buckets or old milk jugs that have been cut in half, cups, ice cube trays, Dixie cups, or other containers. Choose a size that suits your dogs’ needs. Depending on the size you choose, you can use this tool to feed an individual meal or even an entire day’s food, so keep portions in mind.

Need more tips? We’ve got ’em!

Tapping Into A Dog’s Senses Can Be the Most Powerful Tool to Keep Them Happy

Tapping Into A Dog’s Senses Can Be the Most Powerful Tool to Keep Them Happy

Just like humans, dogs have five basic senses. Ignoring their sensory needs may lead to stress and undesirable behaviors.

fred on couch

Source: Animal Farm Foundation

Let’s Break This Down:

  • Who doesn’t love pizza? It’s awesome. But if you ate it every day, it would get really gross.
  • Staring at a computer all day starts to suck after a few hours. You don’t just want to look at something different, your body needs you to look at something different.
  • A 5-hour plane ride with a screaming baby is never fun and the radio gets really tiring when they play the same song over and over again.
  • Sniffing cleaner all day is really not a good idea and if you think about, sniffing the same flower all day is going to get overwhelming.
  • Does a massage sound like heaven right about now?

Now that you get the idea, let’s stop anthropomorphizing and get real world methods for dog enrichment:

Sound 

Sound is a dog’s most highly developed sense. A dog can get agitated and nervous just from hearing other dogs bark.

colt-head-tilt.jpg

Source: Animal Farm Foundation

Keep shelter dogs quiet with Click for Quiet games in which you reward quiet dogs with positive “YES!” (or clicker sound) and a treat. Don’t give barking dogs any attention. This is a great project for volunteers.

Soft or soothing music also helps keep dogs quiet. Try classical music, audio books, or music created specifically for dogs.

Smell

is how dogs greet the world. Shelters not only smell like other animals, but are often full of chemical odors.

Create fun things for dogs to do with their noses. Make “find it” puzzles by hiding treats in blankets, towels, or rags. Hide treats in a fenced yard for some fun outdoor time. Don’t forget to cheer them on as they sniff out the rewards.

aac easter 3

Source: Amalia Diaz for Austin Animal Center

Use interactive toys or make your own. Drill a few holes in PVC pipe elbows (big enough for treats to fit through) and then let your dog play with the toy to get the treats to fall out.

Another great trick is to fill a spray bottle with water and 10-20 drops of an essential oil, such as lavender, vanilla, or almond. Spray a fine mist on their beds, blankets, or kennel walls. Rotate the scents to keep the dogs engaged.

Sight 

Sight can be tricky because no matter how long the dog is in your shelter, the environment never becomes natural. Some dogs get stressed by dogs or humans simply passing by their kennels.

Moon (24)

Source: Animal Farm Foundation

For reactive dogs, place barriers at the front or sides of their kennel. This can be anything like poster board, sheets, shower curtains, etc… Have people toss treats as they pass by the dog. This will help him associate traffic flow with positive things.

It is important to give dogs an occasional change of scenery. Let them take a stroll around the parking lot, spend an afternoon at the front desk or in someone’s office, or let them go on a play date. Changing up which kennel they spend time in works well for some dogs, too.

Taste 

is closely linked with smell. This may cause some dogs to ignore food due to the unfamiliar smells in a shelter environment. Poor health might also affect a dog’s sense of smell, causing them to ignore meals.

enrichment toys

Try adding broths, like chicken or beef, to food or serve alone. Soak rags or tug toys in broth. Freeze and give as a special treat. (These are especially good for teething puppies!)

For dogs who inhale their food, try feeding from Kongs, milk jugs, bottles, PVC pipes, and other feeding puzzles. These add an element of stimulation and help slow down the eating process.

Touch

Touch is important because shelter dogs often don’t get enough human contact. We rush to exercise and feed them but forget to sit and touch them. Patting and massaging dogs, especially in a quiet space, promotes a better mental and emotional state.

sherlock-and-jeremy

Source: Animal Farm Foundation

Enlist volunteers to work as “quiet time” companions for your dogs. Have them sit in the dog’s kennel for 10+ minutes to pet and massage them. They can bring a book and read to them! Not only does the massage feel good, it also teaches dogs how to stay calm when there are people around.

We know enrichment can be intimidating to some shelter workers, but once you take the leap, you’ll realize that it’s simple. Plus, it results in lots of smiling dogs, and there’s nothing better than that.

You Don’t Like to Be Bored, and Neither Do Shelter Dogs

You Don’t Like to Be Bored, and Neither Do Shelter Dogs

As humans, we lead stressful lives. We all know that de-stressing is a process. One hour of relaxing won’t keep you calm, cool, and collected for the rest of your life. You need consistent breaks and things to occupy your time and your mind.

Dogs are the same way. A dog needs more than a 15 minute stand alone enrichment activity. Enrichment is a process that creates a more positive and productive shelter experience for the dogs in your care.

Enrichment reduces stress, boredom, and undesired behaviors by supporting a dog’s sensory and social needs. It also adds value to your shelter dogs’ lives by teaching them basic manners and giving them the confidence to make a good impression on potential adopters.

Unhappy, frustrated, or bored dogs will not show well in their kennels and that will put off potential adopters. Enrichment helps to counter kennel-induced behaviors by making the dogs’ environments more stimulating and challenging. Toys, puzzles, sensory games, playgroups, and other novel experiences are perfect for this.

How Do Enrichment Programs Work?

Have a Plan

Because shelters are hectic places, it’s important to have an enrichment game plan in place before your dogs’ needs become critical.

Here’s how to build a great plan:

  • Train your staff to recognize the early signs of stress.
  • Recruit and train volunteers to work with and support your dogs.
  • Network with other shelters and rescues, as well as breed clubs, trainers, and other
    professionals.
  • Solicit donation of enrichment items from the community.
  • Build a network of trained foster homes.

What Do You Do Once You Have a Plan?

The Old Standbys

  • Use old ice cube trays or Dixie cups to create small, yummy ice treats. Put a few pieces of kibble, yogurt, peanut butter or treats in the bottom, fill with broth and freeze.
  • Smear Kongs or Nylabones with peanut butter or cream cheese. Hand it over to one of your most stressed dogs for a quick, satisfying treat.
  • Short 5-minute basic obedience training sessions are perfect. You can do these outside of kennels. Don’t forget to end on a positive note.

Already Do Those? Here’s More Creative and Incredibly Simple Stuff

  • Bring a dog into your office for a little while. Kennels are noisy. A dog will appreciate a quiet place to nap or getting some attention from a new friend.
  • Move dogs to different kennels to give them a change of scenery.
  • Take a dog for a car ride when you go on a coffee run. Adopters love to know how dogs behave in the car.
  • Play audiobooks, which research says can reduce stress in shelter dogs.
  • Bring a radio into the kennels and tune into a classical music channel.
  • Add an essential oil, such as lavender, to a spray bottle filled with water. Walk through the kennels and mist the air with a new scent.
  • Give small dogs a chance to sit on something new by adding a chair to their kennel.
  • Hang a wind chime near the kennels and let the sounds soothe your dogs.
  • Blow bubbles in the kennels for visual stimulation – and great photo ops.

How Do You Find Time and Money?

We’ve already established that enrichment tools are often things you have lying around your shelter. But here are some other thoughts:

  • Hold an enrichment supply drive and collect anything from Kongs and Nylabones to PVC pipes, peanut butter, milk jugs, plastic bottles, blankets, and towels.
  • Set up an Amazon.com wish list so donors know your shelters needs.
  • Sign up for the Kong Cares program and receive discounted rates on Kong toys.
  • Get volunteers to create some of these enrichment toys and treats.
  • Have volunteers and staff do dog social walks. In addition to exercise, dogs get to spend time getting to know their roommates.

Have a great story to tell about your enrichment program? Message us on Facebook! We’d love to hear it and you may get featured on our blog!

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