Help These Two K9 Heroes Get the Recognition They Deserve

Help These Two K9 Heroes Get the Recognition They Deserve

Help These K9 Heroes Get the Recognition They Deserve

5

March 2018

Not one, but two of our narcotics detection dogs have been nominated for a Hero Dog Award!

Celebrating heroes on “both ends of the leash,” the Hero Dog Awards is put on by American Humane. The organization will fly seven finalists and their humans to a gala in Hollywood. The ceremony will be broadcast on the Hallmark Channel.

The best part is that American Humane will donate $2,500 to each finalist’s charity partners. The charity partner of the winner of the American Hero Dog Award will receive an additional $5,000.

K9 Kano

K9 Kano works in Stafford, Kansas with Officer Mason Paden. The hero wasn’t on the job long before he sniffed out over $7,500 in illegal marijuana! Because of this bust, the police dog had a meteoric rise to fame and received lots of press for his good work. This press changes people’s perception of dogs labeled “pit bull” and provides a springboard for the conversation that it’s a dog’s individual nature that determines their destiny, not their heritage or history.

His charity partner for the contest is

Vote for Kano

 

K9 Sheeva

K9 Sheeva is from Harris County Animal Shelter in Texas. Now she has a very important job with the Littleville Police Department in Alabama. She is the first non-specific breed police dog in the state. Her partner, Officer John Cantrell says that Sheeva is “living the American Dream” because she “came from nothing and become something” – and that something is a hero who keeps her community safe.

You can follow K9 Sheeva on Instagram @K9_Sheeva.

Her charity partner is K9s4Cops and her sponsor is the K-9 Courage Program from Zoetis.

 

Vote for K9 Sheeva

Both K9 Sheeva and K9 Kano are proof that shelter dogs have the potential to do the same work as purebred, purpose-bred dogs. We should never make assumptions about a dog based on their appearance, heritage, or history. We should always look at the dog in front of us and ask “Who are you?”

Want to learn more about how you can participate in our work?

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From Shelter to Working K9: “Pit Bull” Dogs Keeping Communities Safe

From Shelter to Working K9: “Pit Bull” Dogs Keeping Communities Safe

It is the mission of Animal Farm Foundation to secure equal treatment and opportunity for “pit bull” dogs and in an effort to meet that mission, Animal Farm Foundation has formed a collaboration with Austin Pets Alive! and Universal K9 so that rescued and sheltered “pit bull” dogs can be considered for Detection Dog work, which is traditionally reserved for pure bred, purpose bred dogs.

Potential detection dog candidates are selected from the Austin Pets Alive! shelter system to participate in training led by Universal K9, located in San Antonio, Texas. Once there, Brad Croft founder of Universal K9, trains and places the dogs in police departments around the country at no charge. Animal Farm Foundation provides a sponsorship to Universal K9 to help cover the costs of the officer training. We recently had the chance to ask Brad a few questions about the program.

AFF: What are some of the things you train the dogs to do?

Brad: Universal K9 trains dogs for narcotics, explosives, cadaver, and arson detection. We also train dogs to track for criminal apprehension and have trained dogs for vapor detection as well.

K9 Loll and the Chief  of Barlette Texas PD

K9 Loll and the Chief of Barlette Texas PD

Can you tell our readers about the partnership between Universal K9 and Austin Pets Alive? When did you first get the idea to assess shelter dogs at APA! for your program?

I reached out to APA! and other local shelters about three years ago letting them know that I was seeking high drive dogs. Mike Kaviani, the Dog Behavior Program Manager at APA!, responded and I went out to test a few of their dogs. The ones I choose were all “pit bull” dogs. It can be challenging to place dogs that are labeled as “pit bulls” or “pit bull mixes,” because of misconceptions and prejudices, but I was able to find a couple of police departments early on that were open minded and I was able to place the dogs.

Has the response from police departments to “pit bull” detection dogs changed over the past 3 years? Are they more willing to accept them?

Many are still reluctant. But the sponsorship through AFF is helping to open some minds to the possibility of accepting a “pit bull” dog into their department.

What qualities are you looking for in a detection dog? If you transfer a dog from APA! for training, but it turns out they’re not a good fit, what happens to the dogs?

I look for dogs who are high drive, confident, and curious. If they’re strongly motivated by toys, that’s a plus. The dogs that don’t make it into the program are adopted out through us or APA!

K9 Libby

K9 Libby

It seems there is a common misconception by both the public and the working dog industry that dogs can’t be working K9s unless they are a specific breed or bred for the purpose of law enforcement work. In your experience, have you found that shelter dogs are just as capable of doing the work?

Any dog that has the drive, confidence, and desire to work can do it! Breed does not dictate a dog’s ability to work. I personally have a mutt – I have no idea what breed mix she is – but she is the best working dog I have ever come across! She can find narcotics and track people better than any “typical” police dog I’ve ever seen.

How many “pit bull” dogs have you placed with law enforcement? Can you tell us about one or two of these placements and the work they’re currently doing in their communities?

At this point we’ve trained and placed about 10 “pit bull” dogs with law enforcement agencies around the country. There are two dogs that really stand out right now.

K9 Ruby

K9 Ruby

K9 Libby with the Montgomery County, TX Constables was recently featured in People Magazine and has been dubbed “The World’s Raddest Police Dog” across social media for her work.  K9 Ruby with the Chattahoochee Hills Police Department in GA made her first bust this month. Both dogs have their own Facebook pages and have lots of fans cheering them on!

Both are performing very well and making a huge difference in the communities in which they serve. It’s really awesome and I’m very happy to be a small part of it.

Thank you Brad for being much more than a small part in this important work!

To learn more about the detection dog program, please visit our website.